Future of Pararescuemen in a STS

Hello all, I was recently selected by one of the ANG STS's as a PJ candidate and I am hoping to go to basic soon.

The unit to which I am going has indicated their vision for the future of STS's. I wanted to get opinions from others in this forum regarding their knowledge or predictions for the future of ST, and more speicifically a PJ in an ST unit.

Is the future going to be augmentation to Army (75th and SF) and NAVY (SEAL) teams? Or, are STS's going to operate as their own unit?

Interested to hear your thoughts.
 
There is a lot of discussion going on about that topic at the moment. I would start with the 2030 vision document and go from there. There will be ridiculous amounts of changes coming over the next few years.
 
The current status quo for an STS PJ involves both types of work that you mentioned. Guys commonly augment sister service teams to act as a TRS (Technical Rescue Specialist)/backup medic. They also commonly deploy as an STT that conducts CSAR or surveys.

There's been a lot of discussion as to how both Rescue and Special Tactics will evolve. One of the SOF truths is "competent Special Operations Forces cannot be created after emergencies occur." This state of preparation isn't just about making sure that we have enough guys wearing berets, its also about making sure that the community postures itself for appropriate and meaningful work as conflicts change.

CCT dedication to the SOF JTAC mission and CSAR teams expanding alert to cover comprehensive front-line emergency response with the Pedro mission are good examples of ST/Rescue branching out in appropriate and justified ways.

As long as as the profession is called "Pararescue", people are always going to look to the PJ on the team to solve emergencies. Whether you're one of the guys in the stack on an assault or there just in case an aircraft crashes, that calling and expectation isn't going away any time soon.
 
IndocCommandant,

I was able to find the Vision 2030 Document. What is you interpretation of the document in regards to the future of Special Tactics?

My thoughts are that the future vision for Special Tactics is to include all of the following core competencies: "(1) rapid global mobility, (2) special operations, (3) agile combat support, (4) partnership building [FID?], (5) global integrated intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR), and (6) personnel recovery." (p.116)

Gen. Shaud argues for an increase in personnel recovery. He claims that, "[t]he need for civilian and limited combat search and rescue operations is self evident. Because of the large scale of the Nigerian crisis, demands in this area are likely to be much greater than what is required of the USAF in Afghanistan and Iraq. In fact, the number of civilian personnel involved in this effort will undoubtedly cause personnel recovery efforts to reach historic levels."


Thoughts?
 
For those interested, I've done some additional research on my own on this topic and wanted to share this article:

The Rise of AFSOC's Special Tactics

Specifically, the section called 'Eyes on the Next Flight.' Here is an excerpt:

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Others, like Norrad, imagine a near future where Air Force special tactics operators are deployed for “unilateral missions, without a security force, without Delta, without the Army.” Precisely because the special tactics members have become “so well qualified and trained,” Norrad thinks Air Force operators could deploy to “certain strategic places” as a secretive force when heavy surveillance of a US joint special operations compound makes undetected movement difficult.

“Moving a few Air Force guys some place, [they] might not detect that,” he said. Such a force could “take down a foreign country nuclear plant” or take on a mission involving “chemical weapons, or [hit] an airfield some place undetected.” These are the sorts of missions that might make sense in light of the Pentagon move in August 2016 to give SOCOM primary responsibility for countering weapons of mass destruction.
Whatever the future looks like for special tactics airmen, it will certainly involve “day after day after day, going and getting bad guys,” Fiel said.
</div></div>

I recommend reading the entire article.

-NightTrain
 

Yukon

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There is much liberty of leaping to might be and can be the future in the rise of AFSOC's Special Tactics article. Further focus being the most decorated airmen in the Air Force since Vietnam avoids the Korean War and the first half of the Cold War (1947-1991). Although USSOCOM, JSOC, and AFSOC didn't come about until the mid-1980s and early 1990s there were plenty of special operations missions conducted throughout the cold war.

Expanding concepts of operations requires a mission need and discreetly moving few Air Force guys someplace hoping they might not be detected happened quite a bit during the cold war. Unfortunately the more "take down" effort needed on the ground requires much supply, resupply, and CAS support not to mention the few persons placed on the ground to do something also need to be extracted. While much is suggested by parachute insertion of a small team, such suggestion must also consider how to get the small team extracted.

One of my ancient history being there experience involves being the Team Leader on one of the two HH-53s flying over the coast of Libya when we bombed Tripoli 15 April 1986. Although lack of ELT and lack of F-111 crash location resulted in lack of approval to proceed in land to do a combat rescue there were many aspects planned. The primary course of action was to do a landing or hoist recovery rescue with secondary being a more extended surface operation with several different extract options. There was of course emergency plan-of-action options should the H-53 go down at sea off the coast of Libya or somewhere in Libya. This is not my only almost being in combat experience during the cold war but all of my almost in combat missions during the cold war involved a bit more than just a small handful of people being put some place as who ever is put on the ground needs to be supported.
 
You won't be in STS YOU will. Bein a rescue squadron. You will be doing combat support. YOU will wash out if you don't give me a realistic confrontation of the Pipeline you are taking on.

I'm smart, I'm gonna make selection into the one AndAnd only 75th as a chemical biological radio. Nuclear boy. Rangers lead the way.

ARMY does more anyway.
 
I wnt some of you to confront how difficult this is. If you want to collect a check it won't be as a Pararescueman. It will be after you wash out. The real deals are laughing at you! This is 100% physical . Remove 'quit' from your pleasant diction and get ready to see some red blood.
 
Some of these clowns i come across on a daily basis in public are better off with a maroon Texas a&m cap... They're scrubs. Watch them struggle, and laugh.
 

Yukon

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted by repgilbreath</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Some of these clowns i come across on a daily basis in public are better off with a maroon Texas a&m cap... They're scrubs. Watch them struggle, and laugh.</div></div>And then there are the clowns that post here about other clowns. Thanks for the laughs
 
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted by repgilbreath</div><div class="ubbcode-body">You won't be in STS YOU will. Bein a rescue squadron. You will be doing combat support. YOU will wash out if you don't give me a realistic confrontation of the Pipeline you are taking on.

I'm smart, I'm gonna make selection into the one AndAnd only 75th as a chemical biological radio. Nuclear boy. Rangers lead the way.

ARMY does more anyway.</div></div>

What you’ve just said is one of the most insanely idiotic things I have ever heard. At no point in your rambling, incoherent response were you even close to anything that could be considered a rational thought. Everyone in this [chat]room is now dumber for having listened to it. I award you no points, and may God have mercy on your soul.
 

Yukon

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Staff member
Operator
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted by repgilbreath</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> Bein a rescue squadron. You will be doing combat support.</div></div>
Not according to the Air Force and the combatant commanders.

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote</div><div class="ubbcode-body">AFI 10-201:

Combat Units—Forces expected to fire weapons, conduct reconnaissance, or engage in other activities directly related to combat operations. Includes, but not limited to, Fighter, Bomber, Reconnaissance, Special Tactics,<span style="color: #CC0000"> Rescue (Guardian Angel)</span>, Special Ops, Missile, and Airborne Command and Control squadrons, regardless of MAJCOM.

Combat Support Units—Forces whose primary mission is to provide combat support to combat forces, and is a part or prepared to become a part of a theater, command, or task force, formed for combat operations (e.g., munitions, maintenance, intelligence, weather, medical, and communications). Includes, but not limited to, Airlift, Refueling, Aircraft Maintenance, Munitions, Security Forces,<span style="color: #CC0000"> Rescue (Aviation)</span>, Numbered AF, Air Operations, Air Control, Weather, Space (Operations, Communications, Reconnaissance, etc.), Cyberspace Operations (DoD Information Network (DoDIN) Operations), Communications, Logistics Readiness, Aerial Port, Aerospace Evacuation, RED HORSE, Prime BEEF (includes engineer, fire emergency services (FES), EOD, and Civil Engineering (CE) emergency management personnel), Intelligence, Medical, and any FOA that has consolidated all of their resources and deploys them into theater (e.g., AF Office of Special Investigations (AFOSI))</div></div> I highlighted in red to differentiate the existence of aviation rescue squadrons and Guardian Angel rescue squadrons. The Guardian Angel rescue squadrons are those PJs and CROs are assigned to, whereas the aviation rescue squadrons are the HH-60 helicopter and HC-130 tanker flying platform squadrons. The GA rescue squadrons are combat units whereas the aviation squadrons are combat support units.

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted by repgilbreath</div><div class="ubbcode-body">
I'm smart, I'm gonna make selection into the one AndAnd only 75th as a chemical biological radio. Nuclear boy. Rangers lead the way.</div></div> Apparently not smart enough to know (1) there is no Ranger military occupation in any of the US armed forced and (2) within the 75th Ranger Regiment the most involved operational MOSs are 11B, 11C, 13F, 25C, and 68W. Put another way it is these MOSs most likely to be in the thick of being involved in some action and training. The other MOSs allowing duty assignment within the 75th Ranger Regiment have various direct, indirect and support roles. Further you can get award of MOS and not make it successfully through the 75th Ranger Regiment screening and selection to get a Ranger duty assignment.
 
There's been a considerable measure of talk regarding how both Rescue and Special Tactics will develop. One of the SOF certainties is "skilled Special Operations Forces can't be made after crises happen.
 

Yukon

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Staff member
Operator
It's more a question of integrating something onto the game table that is useful in winning the game that is not already put there by the Army, Navy, and Marine special operations communities. Duplicating what they have and provide will prove difficult to justify and validate.

Before JSOC and USSOCOM there was the United States Strike Command (STRICOM). The name of the command being derived from the acronym for Swift Tactical Reaction In Every Known Environment (STRIKE) was due to desire to avoid rapid escalation to nuclear war which coincidentally was reason for the blockade of Cuba during the Cuban missile crisis. It was a middle ground defense policy between better red then dead and going immediately into mutually destructive nuclear war. When the Southeast Asia conflicts ended much of the Air Force investment in special operations was discarded as it was after the Korean War.

BTW, what differs a skilled special operations forces from skilled conventional forces? Skilled can't be made afterwards is a nice marketing slogan, but very few truly understand what the difference is.

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted by Yukon</div><div class="ubbcode-body"><div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted by repgilbreath</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> Bein a rescue squadron. You will be doing combat support.</div></div>
Not according to the Air Force and the combatant commanders.

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote</div><div class="ubbcode-body">AFI 10-201:

Combat Units—Forces expected to fire weapons, conduct reconnaissance, or engage in other activities directly related to combat operations. Includes, but not limited to, Fighter, Bomber, Reconnaissance, Special Tactics,<span style="color: #CC0000"> Rescue (Guardian Angel)</span>, Special Ops, Missile, and Airborne Command and Control squadrons, regardless of MAJCOM.

Combat Support Units—Forces whose primary mission is to provide combat support to combat forces, and is a part or prepared to become a part of a theater, command, or task force, formed for combat operations (e.g., munitions, maintenance, intelligence, weather, medical, and communications). Includes, but not limited to, Airlift, Refueling, Aircraft Maintenance, Munitions, Security Forces,<span style="color: #CC0000"> Rescue (Aviation)</span>, Numbered AF, Air Operations, Air Control, Weather, Space (Operations, Communications, Reconnaissance, etc.), Cyberspace Operations (DoD Information Network (DoDIN) Operations), Communications, Logistics Readiness, Aerial Port, Aerospace Evacuation, RED HORSE, Prime BEEF (includes engineer, fire emergency services (FES), EOD, and Civil Engineering (CE) emergency management personnel), Intelligence, Medical, and any FOA that has consolidated all of their resources and deploys them into theater (e.g., AF Office of Special Investigations (AFOSI))</div></div> I highlighted in red to differentiate the existence of aviation rescue squadrons and Guardian Angel rescue squadrons. The Guardian Angel rescue squadrons are those PJs and CROs are assigned to, whereas the aviation rescue squadrons are the HH-60 helicopter and HC-130 tanker flying platform squadrons. The GA rescue squadrons are combat units whereas the aviation squadrons are combat support units.

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted by repgilbreath</div><div class="ubbcode-body">
I'm smart, I'm gonna make selection into the one AndAnd only 75th as a chemical biological radio. Nuclear boy. Rangers lead the way.</div></div> Apparently not smart enough to know (1) there is no Ranger military occupation in any of the US armed forced and (2) within the 75th Ranger Regiment the most involved operational MOSs are 11B, 11C, 13F, 25C, and 68W. Put another way it is these MOSs most likely to be in the thick of being involved in some action and training. The other MOSs allowing duty assignment within the 75th Ranger Regiment have various direct, indirect and support roles. Further you can get award of MOS and not make it successfully through the 75th Ranger Regiment screening and selection to get a Ranger duty assignment.
</div></div>
Thanks for schoolin' me on that.
 
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