Medical School to PJ Pipeline - Questions about the transition

I have always had the conviction to serve my country as a PJ, but I've realized that my chance is passing.

I am a second year medical student. I've gone through 4 years of undergrad and have finished 1 out of 4 years of medical school (to become a medical doctor, MD). This is a radical shift which may seem crazy to many people; but for me, I want the brotherhood, I want to receive specialized tactical training, and I want to serve my country - before I become an MD.

I am a married, 24 yr old. No kids. Eagle Scout.

I have several questions:

1a) As a medical student and training MD, will the USAF allow me to enlist and begin the PJ pipeline? Or will the AF send me back to medical school, as per the needs of the military? b) If I wash out, will I have the option to reroute back to Medical School to become a USAF doctor?

2) During the PJ pipeline, how often will I be allowed to see my wife?

3) As per my understanding, when I sign a 4 year contract - I am committing to 4 years of active duty and 4 more years of IRR. After my four years of active duty, my plan would be to return to medical school to finish my last two years, then begin my medical residency while I am IRR status. a) Would I be able to commit 60 hr/week to my schooling while I am IRR status (barring war, natural disaster, etc.)? b) If the pipeline took me 3 years to complete, would my active duty contract automatically be extended?

Thank you for your time and experience.
 
Thank you both for replying!

Special Operations Surgical Teams are new to me. I've considered both STO and CRO, but I want to continue developing my emergency medical skills rather than operate as a people manager..
 
I have always had the conviction to serve my country as a PJ, but I've realized that my chance is passing.

I am a second year medical student. I've gone through 4 years of undergrad and have finished 1 out of 4 years of medical school (to become a medical doctor, MD). This is a radical shift which may seem crazy to many people; but for me, I want the brotherhood, I want to receive specialized tactical training, and I want to serve my country - before I become an MD.

I am a married, 24 yr old. No kids. Eagle Scout.

I have several questions:

1a) As a medical student and training MD, will the USAF allow me to enlist and begin the PJ pipeline? Or will the AF send me back to medical school, as per the needs of the military? b) If I wash out, will I have the option to reroute back to Medical School to become a USAF doctor?

2) During the PJ pipeline, how often will I be allowed to see my wife?

3) As per my understanding, when I sign a 4 year contract - I am committing to 4 years of active duty and 4 more years of IRR. After my four years of active duty, my plan would be to return to medical school to finish my last two years, then begin my medical residency while I am IRR status. a) Would I be able to commit 60 hr/week to my schooling while I am IRR status (barring war, natural disaster, etc.)? b) If the pipeline took me 3 years to complete, would my active duty contract automatically be extended?

Thank you for your time and experience.
To answer some of your questions from the perspective of a current married PJ cone:

1a): The AF will certainly let you enlist if that is your wish. Probably about half the guys on my team have bachelor’s degrees and I’ve met a couple guys with graduate degrees. While you’re a civilian, the AFSC for which you apply is entirely up to you. I do not have an answer for question 1b.

2): I have seen my wife twice in the last seven months. I think this might be a little less than normal due to the current restrictions surrounding the Coronavirus. Also on that note, getting leave or even a weekend pass has been basically impossible since March. But do not expect to see your wife even under the best/normal circumstances much until after dive school.
 
2B is a completely separate process. If you’re going PJ and you wash out you would be given an AFSC needs of the Air Force. During that time if you have your MD you can apply to ODS and be given a doctor slot that way
 

Yukon

Moderator
Staff member
Operator
You may want to look at the requirements for the professional commission vs line commission. It's a bit more than just possessing the academic medical degree.

5.7.1. Professional Qualifications. Applicants for the health professions are awarded a primary AFSC reflecting the specialty or sub-specialty in which they are most qualified. This qualification is based on training, experience, license, and standards set forth in the AFOCD.
 

Yukon

Moderator
Staff member
Operator
SW has access to the most current info, but it is my understanding is the vectoring essence of the new contract is while the desires of student-candidate for a specific occupation specialty (AFSC) is considered there is no failing a specific AFSC selection and assessment. Vector's intent is once accessed, the program supports proper training and use of Airmen in support of the Air Force mission. Accordingly A&S is optimized for all four enlisted 1Z occupation specialties (1Z1X1, 1Z2X1, 1Z3X1, and 1Z4X1). Thus the implementation of the active duty (regular Air Force) 9T500 Reporting Identifier AFSC (Career field) GTEP enlistment contract.

Reporting Identifier 9T500, Basic Special Warfare Enlisted Airman. (Established 30 Apr 20) Use this identifier to report the primary, control, and duty AFSCs of a special warfare enlisted airman who has not been awarded an AFS and to report the duty of an enlisted airman attending basic training, Special Warfare Preparatory course and Special Warfare Assessment and Selection course as applicable. Related DoD Occupational Subgroup: 195000.
Thus a not selected determination is the student candidate either lacked the desired aptitudes, characteristics, skills, and abilities to be accessed (vectored) into one of the four enlisted 1Z occupation specialties or the student candidate decided to voluntarily self initiate eliminate (SIE) for some reason to include not desiring (refusing) to be vectored into an 1Z AFSC not being desired. A lack decision removal is a decision made by a training manager to remove the student candidate for further training into any of the four enlisted 1Z occupation specialties. An SIE is the student-candidates decision to remove themselves from all further training required for entry into any of the four 1Z enlisted occupation specialty training pipelines required for award of 3-skill level AFSC.

The essence of vectoring is it allows entering into any one of the four 1Z AFSCs within the needs of the Air Force without the need to a formal entry reclassification into a new training pipeline action due to some sort of failure issue. The being removed from further training into any of the 1Z occupation specialty training pipelines required for award for 3-skill level is a formal reclassification action addressed in various policies. I highlighted in red some test to consider as an SIE isn't the training manager disqualifying an individual from training and the policies don't clearly address the new GTEP 9T500 AFSC active duty enlistment into the !Z career field rather than a specific occupation specialty AFSC (1Z1X1, 1Z2X1, 1Z3X1, and 1Z4X1). Neither does policy address the GTEP contract obligation of the Air Force and the student-candidate when removed for whatever reason from Special Warfare A&S.

AFI36-2101: 4.1.12.3. Enlisted:

4.1.12.3.1. If the training manager disqualifies an individual from training in IAW AFI 36-2201, Air Force Training Program, the MPS will submit an AFSC disqualification action via CMS to HQ AFPC/DPSIC.

4.1.12.3.2. Upon receipt of a CMS case for RC personnel, HQ AFPC/DPSIC will refer the case to ANG/A1PO or AFR/A1KK, respectively for internal processing. The servicing RC MPS will finalize the action and, if approved, update MilPDS.
4.1.12.3.3. Withdraw the AFSC when an enlisted airman is eliminated from an AFSC awarding or formal training course that is mandatory for skill progression and listed as mandatory in the AFECD. NOTE: See AFI 36-2626, table 2.2, for disposition of retraining formal school eliminees. 4.1.12.3.4. Do not withdraw an AFSC if it will be reinstated at a later date.

4.1.14. Airmen leaving a SDI, regardless of reason (Voluntary or Involuntary) without a military skill (Valid awarded AFSC at the 3-level or higher) to which they are eligible to return, must be reviewed for future utilization. If the airman cannot be utilized after pursuing the following utilization options, initiate disqualified airman processing through CMS to HQ AFPC/DPSIC. Upon receipt of a CMS case for RC personnel, HQ AFPC/DPSIC will refer the case to ANG/A1PO or AFR/A1KK, respectively for internal processing. The servicing RC MPS will finalize the action and, if approved, update MilPDS.

4.1.15.1. Assess feasibility of returning to AFSCs previously withdrawn (or to have been withdrawn) for lack of recent performance IAW paragraph

4.1.2. 4.1.15.2. If eligible, airman may apply for retraining IAW AFI 36-2626.

AFI36-2626 : 5.3. Disqualified Airmen Retraining Program. AF policy is to retrain only those Airmen who have demonstrated the ability to successfully complete training and whose past record clearly justifies further investment. Retraining is not a guarantee and is subject to AFSC quota availability. NOTE: Not applicable to pipeline students. <--- 5.3 predominately address personnel awarded a 3-kill level or higher AFSC and is no longer qualified to hold the currently awarded AFSC. However subject to AFSC quota availability is always in play once removed by a training manager from Special Warfare career field A&S.

5.3.1. Disqualified Airman, Awaiting Retraining, Disqualified for Reasons Beyond Airman’s Control (Reporting Identifier 9A000). Airman with a reporting identifier of 9A000 and who are otherwise eligible for retraining, are considered based on entry requirements, class start date, and availability date. Airmen are considered for retraining within 180 days of AFSC disqualification notification from HQ AFPC/DP3DW through their MPF. Those not selected for retraining after 12 months from disqualification are no longer eligible for retraining consideration. Exceptions: Medical processing or other reasons deemed appropriate by AFPC/DP3DW do not result in reporting identifier change after 12 months of consideration.

5.3.2. Disqualified Airman, Awaiting Retraining-Disqualified for Reasons Within Airman’s Control (Reporting Identifier 9A100). Airmen with a reporting identifier of 9A100, are only considered for available AFSCs for which they qualify and are otherwise eligible with formal training starting within 60 days
 
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