Oldest after rescue mission report I have found.

Yukon

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A mission report of a February 1945 jump mission in the CBI theater. It gives insight into why those selected to perform parachute rescue team duties post WWII went through a screening and selection process. Records indicate during the period from 2 August 1943 thru to August 1945 about 150 rescue were made by parachuting in rescue teams.

The only other region during WWII having many insertions of rescue teams by Parachute were Alaska, Canada, and Greenland.

The first full-time parachute rescue teams were established by the Air Rescue Service during 1947. What differed these parachute rescue teams from previous parachute rescue teams is training was much more robust to include attendance of U.S. Forest Service Smoke Jumper Course (continued until about 1955), use of Smoke Jumper jumpmaster techniques and procedures to determine where to exit from the aircraft to land with precision into a small drop zone or specific group of trees.
 

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This is a news reel film clip of the first parachute rescue team use in a combat theater during WWII. It happened in the CBI theater as result of a C-46 crash happening 2 August 1943. The clip mention friendly indigenous tribe peoples who were former head hunters. However head hunting was still prevalent in the region between hostile tribes. Some tribes were more aligned with the Japanese than the Allied forces in 1943.


Gives a bit more detail: The Hump: Death and Salvation on the Aluminum Trail Of interest it discloses the radio operator carried out on the litter in the provide film footage was subsequently killed in a B-25 crash (shot down by zeros.).

"With the B-25’s second engine in flames, Porter ordered the crew to bail out. Copilot Spain, wearing his bulky parachute, got stuck in the cockpit’s narrow overhead escape hatch; the end seemed near until Porter pushed him free. Seconds after Spain pulled his ripcord, the B-25 smashed into a ridge and exploded, killing Porter, Oswalt, and three crewmembers. “The magnificent Oswalt met a sudden death in the mountains he had so painfully survived with us,” a mournful Sevareid later wrote. After a 15-day trek, sole survivor James Spain reached Chabua on Christmas Day."
 
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Yukon

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The Legacy of the Clobbered Turkey Tragedy There is some info left out, probably because the author isn't aware of some info.

The assertion "Sunday night, three Air Force men volunteered to jump to the crash site" is some what correct, but they had concerns about doing the jump at night and were ordered to jump by a flag officer who was subsequently relieved of his command.

The accident report finding of "The subsequent investigation showed that the three jumpers were doomed because of a lack of training and lack of equipment. Lt. Kinney had no jump experience, and none of them had sufficient survival gear, nor even proper Arctic clothing. They had jumped in the dark and misjudged the 25-40 knot surface winds, and two were dragged across the tundra for long distances by their cutes" is also correct. However not disclosed is this is the rescue operation that caused ARS pararescue personnel to be assigned to the 10th rescue squadron which was an Alaska Air Command unit and not a ARS unit.

When this crash and rescue happened the Air Rescue Service had already obtained approval for SSN 3833 for the personnel assigned to its land rescue and parachute rescue teams. More importantly a training requirement requiring the parachutist to go through the U.S. Forest smoke jumper training was already implemented. There is a lot of legacy not disclosed in this article.
 

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Evaluation of the E&E survival training, McCall AFB, Idaho, 20 July 1953.

This is a trip report document from a student going through E&E/survival training at McCall AFB, Idaho. Please note this course was not a SAC course or an operating location of the Stead survival school.

This course has origins of being established as an element of the 2156th ARU (TTU), MacDill AFB, Florida in December 1949 as a survival and escape and evasion course, while not established specifically to train personnel Air Rescue Service being assigned to its land rescue and parachute rescue teams, the 12 NCO instructors for the course came from these teams.

When this course was organizationally realigned under the Air Resupply and Communications Service in December 1953 it was still Air Rescue Service providing the instructors.

Much AFSOC histories emphasize the involvement of Major Fillingham of the British Army, but it seldom, if ever, mention he was Deputy Commander. The commander was Lt. Colonel, MSC, John C. Shumate who had previous MSC assignment on 3rd Air Rescue Squadron pararescue team in Korea. SERE histories give no mention this course/school.

The E&E/survival training of pararescue personnel relocated to McChord AFB, effective December 1953 and such specialized training ended on September 1, 1954 concurrent with the Air Staff transferring responsibility for Stead and its survival mission from Strategic Air Command to the Air Training Command.
 
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