Operator Fitness Test

Hello,

I've been training for the AFSOC test (3 mile run, pushups, Situps, pull-ups, 1500m swim, underwaters) and just recently was told that I would be testing a completely different test called the Operator Fitness Test. The events are nothing like the original PAST test where it was big on aerobic effort. This Operator Fitness Test is basically like the NFL Combine with a 3 mile ruck in it. Here are the events I will be tested on..

-3 mile ruck in 49 minutes, 60 pounds

-Standing Long Jump, 78 inches or greater

-Pro Agility Test, 5.75 seconds or faster

-Trap Bar Deadlift, 225 pounds for 3 reps minimum

-pull-ups, 8 minimum

-Farmers carry, 100 yards with a 53 pound kettlebell in each hand, compete it in 30 seconds or less

-300 yard shuttle run in 80.5 seconds or less

-Combat Fin swim 1500m

-4x25m underwater swim at 02:30 intervals

When training for the PAST or the AFSOC test, I had to run a lot either in sprint intervals or long slow distance runs, perform calisthenics, and swim lots of laps. Cardio, stamina, and endurance was the point. Now, it seems to be all power and speed. How should I train for this now? I imagine that if I trained according to this new test, I can perform. But then if I get to the pipeline and we are running miles on end and etc., I may not have the same cardio base. Any tips on how to keep my cardio base but train for these new standards? I don't want to lose my cardio base and obviously would like to be ready for either test.

-Torres
 

SW

Administrator
Staff member
Operator
You may find this helpful. Article written by an AFSW operator and strength/conditioning coach:


SW
 

Jay_Pew02

Member
The test you are referring to is known as the “Tier II fitness test”. It’s a relatively new test. This test is not being utlitlized through the pipeline. It’s for 3 level Operators and above. (I.e., once you have your beret). Do not worry about this test at all right now, as a candidate or a trainee.

The pipeline is about endurance, stick with the training regiment you’ve been doing that will prepare you for the standards of whatever pipeline you are entering. The pipeline will also Build you to make you much stronger than when you first entered. So by the time you would graduate and have to take your first Tier II, the standards will not even be remotely out of reach for a young 3 level fresh out of the pipeline.

Overall point, Tier II is not the goal for you right now, meeting the already established pipeline standards is.
 

SW

Administrator
Staff member
Operator
Correction to the above: The Operator Fitness Test could likely show up at CRO/STO or enlisted retrainee Phase II selection courses.

Regardless, as Jay_Pew has stated, train for the rigors of A&S and the pipeline rather than a particular test.

SW
 
As a unit, the 306th is utilizing the Operator Fitness Test to gauge how well a candidate for our squadron will physically perform in A&S. After observing the 3rd class of A&S from beginning to end, it was our opinion that the PAST test would not predict physical success in the new A&S in the slightest. The events in the OFT are similar to events witnessed at A&S. While I agree that it is paramount to have a high level of aerobic fitness in the pipeline, it is now just as important to also have the ability to carry a heavy ruck long distances and have a solid strength base.
 

Yukon

Moderator
Staff member
Operator
Most interesting is the reliance on the Operator Fitness test for a course, even though it is a assessment and selection course that is no longer occupation specific. The testing standards disclosed in the original post lacks connection to a specific military occupation and if its an officially approved and implemented occupational specific fitness (Tier 2) it is not identified in AFI 36-2908, Fitness Program or any Air Force Guidance Memorandums (AFGMs).

The interesting comes into play from a 2018 AFGM which officially identifies, establishes, and implements the "ALO and TACP Tier 2 Operator Fitness Test". The take away is this operator fitness test is purported to have scientific determined specific relevance to unique TACP-enlisted and TACP-Officer (previously 13L ALO) operational mission sets. There is no Tier 2 swimming requirement in the "ALO and TACP Tier 2 Operator Fitness Test".


From a has-been perspective, the asserting " it is now just as important to also have the ability to carry a heavy ruck long distances and have a solid strength base" is misleading. I was doing actual missions and Combat Rescue Training Exercises (CRTES) throughout the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990 carrying a heavy ruck long distances and having a solid strength requirement was always a necessity once off and away from doing gunner/scanner duties on a helicopter.

I agree with the fallacies of training for test day and it is my understanding one of the purposes of the new Special Warfare A&S course was to get it away from being considered passing a sequence of physical fitness tests.
 

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Thanks all for the responses. I was just trying to figure out how to balance lots of cardio with some power/strength events. For example, if people are doing more kettlebell work over free weights or combination of several things. I’ll keep training and add in some more weights for the sake of.

Thanks, again. Always appreciate what this site has to offer.

-Torres
 

Yukon

Moderator
Staff member
Operator
I cannot offer any advice as to reaching a balance between to types of fitness tests. I posted the video as after watching it, it seems to be a doable something easily obtainable and sustainable.

The big difference in body types I see between past and present, regardless of it being U.S. Army Ranger, SF, USN SEALs, and ect, is body types seems to have changed from lean muscle to bulky muscle. Concurrently it seems to me the new so called Operator Fitness test is well within the realm of being easily passable by those lean muscle body types of my era. Unfortunately, I would need to find the Fountain of Youth and get myself and a few from my era a drink from it to verify this opinion.

Also, in my opinion, by changing what is tested avoids the politics of the occupational physical fitness changes being argued as being made more difficult or less difficult as the only comparison event remaining unchanged is pull-ups with combat fin swim, and the underwater breath holding swim requirements not being radically changed. fins vs no fins, 4 underwater vs 2, but with rest interval change between laps.
 
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