Severed fingertip and SR eligibility

According to the standard K23 “absence of any segment of the hand or digits” is a disqualification.

In 2012 I severed my left middle finger from the top of my nail to the tip, just under .5 inch. I retained all movement of the knuckles and finger, have no pain, and can use the finger as normal.

There is no mention of a waiver for this. I am not prior service, 33 years old, currently enrolled in a special operations prep course (run by two former PJs a green beret, and two recon marines). I have no limitations in this course due to my hand.

Can somebody give me some info on what I’m up against.

Thank you very much!
 

Yukon

Moderator
Staff member
Operator
Difficult to say. I'm aware of Vietnam combat era PJ that had a finger didget shot off during a combat rescue. He almost had his arm amputated due to where the bullet travelled. But he never left active duty and returned to pararescue duties after he healed. This was the same mission Duane Hackney took a round to center front of his helmet and exited just behind the ear. The round traveled between skull and helmet. Gave him a significant concussion.
 
Difficult to say. I'm aware of Vietnam combat era PJ that had a finger didget shot off during a combat rescue. He almost had his arm amputated due to where the bullet travelled. But he never left active duty and returned to pararescue duties after he healed. This was the same mission Duane Hackney took a round to center front of his helmet and exited just behind the ear. The round traveled between skull and helmet. Gave him a significant concussion.
Wow!

I can understand that the nature of these conditions are completely up to meps and the FCIII physical board.

These standards leave much want for interpretation. Part of me thinks it means a whole digit mia or a segment of the hand. But it very well might mean a segment of the digit as well.
 

SW

Administrator
Staff member
Operator
If the flight doc determines it meets k23, they will submit a waiver for it to Air Education & Training Command (AETC). The lead flight doc there will be the determining authority. If you have no deficit, and your flight doc concurs, then I would expect the waiver to be approved.
But you're right; there can be loose interpretation built into the medical standards- most likely by design to give the doc the appropriate leeway to make an informed decision.

SW
 
If the flight doc determines it meets k23, they will submit a waiver for it to Air Education & Training Command (AETC). The lead flight doc there will be the determining authority. If you have no deficit, and your flight doc concurs, then I would expect the waiver to be approved.
But you're right; there can be loose interpretation built into the medical standards- most likely by design to give the doc the appropriate leeway to make an informed decision.

SW
Thank you for the info. Much appreciated!
 
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