"Get Selected" book good for air force?

Hello,

I recently purchased the "Get Selected for Special Forces" book by Major Joe Martin to read and educate myself even more about Special Forces in the military, but then realized the knowledge and workout plans it includes is for Army Special Forces, not Air Force. Has anybody read this novel? Do they know how helpful it is or if I should stay away from it since it is Army and not Air Force?

Thanks
 
From what I have read and researched, the pipeline is packed with a hell of a lot of swimming, running and rucking. If you are looking for a book on a workout routine, there are a ton of them out there for different forces. Personally I would grab a hold of Seal Prep Program or an alternative that is swim heavy. If you are looking for a book that gives you a little incite on what the training will be like I would have to say CCT-The Eye of the Storm I & II or Breaking BUD/S: How Regular Guys Can Become Navy SEALs. I know you aren't training to be a Seal but that book covers a lot of what you will see in nearly all the SOF pipelines.
 
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted by professional_47</div><div class="ubbcode-body">There's also "The Official U.S. Air Force Elite Workout" book listed on the specialtactics resource page</div></div>
Can you link me up?
 
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted by connormillard9</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Hello,

I recently purchased the "Get Selected for Special Forces" book by Major Joe Martin to read and educate myself even more about Special Forces in the military, but then realized the knowledge and workout plans it includes is for Army Special Forces, not Air Force. Has anybody read this novel? Do they know how helpful it is or if I should stay away from it since it is Army and not Air Force?

Thanks</div></div>


I've been instructed by a edit: Former ****Green Beret to not make the mistake of thinking SF/Ranger is less than AFSOC AFSCs

I dunno man can you message me? Do you need someone to talk to? This Air Force stuff is difficult .
 

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted by connormillard9</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Do they know how helpful it is or if I should stay away from it since it is Army and not Air Force? </div></div>The perspective of differing physical fitness requirements as being Army, Air Force, Navy, Marine or Coast Guard is too generalized. Such generalized comparison completely lacks the being there doing comparison of what is the better physical fitness training to be a football player vs a baseball player or a water polo player. I used team comparisons as being on such teams requires a baseline common level of fitness combined with a common base line of being effective and efficient in doing skill sets to be a valued team contributor that results in the team being dependable in winning more often than it loses.

The objective and goal of any and all military being fit for combat fitness programs since before written language existed is to enter battle, win the battle, and then return from the battle to win the next battle. The identifying where the most requirement for physical fitness to be there doing something has unfortunately become more difficult as war-fighting automation, robotics, cyber, and technology has who is in battle being far removed from directly physically fighting enemy combatants and often far removed from being in remote harsh physically demanding environments. Pertinent to this, when the Air Force was in the process of establishing itself as a separate military department of the armed forces, deliberate choice was made to ensure all wearing its uniform had one branch designation rather than being composed of several branches as the Army is [infantry (10A), field artillery (13A), air defense artillery (14A), aviation (15A), Special Forces (18A), and Corps of Engineers (21A)—and the armor branch which has armor general (19A), armor (19B), and cavalry (19C)].

Unfortunately until the mid 1980s the Air Force didn't subscribe to having any sort of ground combat capability. Since then being there on or over the battlefield putting life and limbs into harms way directly engaging enemy combat tooth of the Air Force has expanded beyond generally being fighter and bomber pilots to generally being pilots of manned aircraft, special mission aviation (FE/gunners), and the Battlefield Airman AFSCs. Within this generalization it is the Battlefield Airman AFSCs that provide the Air Forces ground combat capability with the distinction being this is a military occupation (AFSC) based generalization rather than the branch generalization one must rely on in discussing the Army's ground combat capability or the Marine ground combat capability which is infantry, field artillery, tank, and combat engineer.

Consequently the minimum sufficient level of physical fitness is driven by the core mission of the unit assigned to which drives the when, where, what and how the being there is expected to be there to do something.
 
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