SWOE is making me very worried, got any information to help me out?

Hey guys, so a month ago I realized I want to be a CCT. Unfortunately a few days ago I found out that SWOE is a thing, and that I essentially have to agree to allow the cadre to decide my fate. This gets me worried. The idea of putting myself through all that hell (training to ship out, BMT, prep, a & s) to pass selection and be forced into a job I don’t want, well the thought of that is rather unsettling to say the least. What are your thoughts and how can I cope with this? I know “top performers” get their pick regardless but this still worries me because I don’t know how “top” I’ll have to be and it’s quite an uncertain thing. I still really wanna be a CCT but this SWOE thing is disheartening, especially when I read that the purpose of it is to fill quotas for the jobs that don’t get as much candidates. Please be honest and open.
 

SW

Administrator
Staff member
Operator
From what I'm hearing lately, CCT is not getting as much candidate interest as the others. So if you perform well, you should be fine.
 
From what I'm hearing lately, CCT is not getting as much candidate interest as the others. So if you perform well, you should be fine.
I just get a odd feeling that they’re trying to dump anyone they can in SR, is this not true?
 

SW

Administrator
Staff member
Operator
I just get a odd feeling that they’re trying to dump anyone they can in SR, is this not true?
This is not true. SR does not have a large career field requirement, hence, less positions to fill. Also, there appears to be plenty of interest from applicants to go SR.

SW
 
I am concerned about the same except I'm training for PJ so is it same or will I be thrown into CCT or SR to fill quotas? I'm asking because I know PJ is a more "popular" career field.
 

Yukon

Moderator
Staff member
Operator
I am concerned about the same except I'm training for PJ so is it same or will I be thrown into CCT or SR to fill quotas? I'm asking because I know PJ is a more "popular" career field.
Essentially for pararescue the inability to meet the entry qualifications requirements and standards has had the same results since 1947. So the worries of SOWE vectoring being a new uncertainty is a nothing worry,
 

Yukon

Moderator
Staff member
Operator
From the Air Force's perspective, nobody is in training for entry classification into any of the occupation specialties (AFSCs) grouped in the Special Warfare Career Field.

Furthermore there is an influence of how much awareness the general population to include reputation of a specific military occupation that contributes to attracting new personnel, In this regard this awareness and reputation has always attracted sufficient numbers of new personnel to put into the required training pipeline. Although training attrition has always been high the Air Force compensated by increasing input which worked well until initiation of the All Volunteer Force (transition away from the Draft/Conscription) in 1973, force reduction so significantly decreased the pool of personnel to acquire a the whey were going through BMT and greater reliance on using the the GTEP enlistment contract to acquire new personnel. This worked well until 1988 when other AFSCs began upping physical fitness requirements and adopted the Pararescue Indoc Course as the expanded beyond MEPS assessment standards to select and gain new personnel. Even now, no matter what forum visited on the worldwide web more individuals disclose a desire to be a PJ than CCT, TACP and SR.

As the GTEP contract didn't become the dominate supply source for new personnel to put into the training pipeline until about 1977 those who SIEed or who eliminated for cause beyond their control where vectored into entry classification into an AFSC based on unfilled slots at a tech school needing a body to put into that training slot.

What SOWE changes is the term and conditions the GTEP contract for entry classification into a specific enlisted occupation specialty (AFSC) to entry classification into any of the four enlisted occupation specialties grouped in the Special Warfare Career Field. The underlying need for the the SOWE contract is to reduce the high Delayed Enlistment Program attrition rate of personnel in Delayed Entry Program (DEP). A problem that has intensified significantly the initiation of the All Volunteer Force (transition away from the Draft/Conscription) in 1973, force reduction so significantly decreased the pool of personnel to acquire a the whey were going through BMT and greater reliance on using the the GTEP enlistment contract to acquire new personnel. To some extent the GTEP contract in reduces prior to enlisting entry classification uncertainty be guaranteeing a specific AFSC during the enlistment process and before reporting to BMT. The unintended consequences is the GTEP encouraged a sense of entitlement to a specific AFSC prior to enlisting and a expectancy (passing the PAST, expanded to include TAPAS) of being able to successfully get through the assessment and selection courses.

The Special Warfare Operator Enlistment (SOWE) contract is nothing more than a solution to reduce DEP attrition and increase cost efficiency by putting more new personnel for entry classification into these AFSC to BMT for purposes to fill the existing training slots. The SOWE cannot reduce DEP and Training attrition costs without existence of a combined A&S training environment that aligns the training pipelines to a common to all entry into training start day. There are many causals for training attrition, but a significant contributing cause is individuals entering into training perceive their performance and ability to be adequate and sufficient based upon assessments necessary to get to BMT with the GTEP/SOWE contract. However, during A&S perceived performance and abilities expectation confronts actual observation and assessment of performance and abilities which may indicate better suitability for an AFSC other than the one being hoped for and diverting (vectoring) the individual voluntarily (encouraging) in this direction rather than forcing into which would do nothing favorable in reducing voluntary (SIE) training attrition which as always been higher than nonvoluntarily causes of disqualification removal from training.

As the goals include reducing voluntary (SIE) attrition any deliberate or perceived forcing new personnel during A&S into another special warfare specialty is counter productive in impairing ability of the Air Force to bring in new personnel for these occupational specialties and would likely result in increasing the voluntary attrition rate at the A&S course. As nonvoluntary disqualification (medical, training injury, disciplinary, inability to learn) removal from training results in the same outcome the fate as they have always been, such insecurities about what might happen are in play as they always have been. Try or try not. Commit to succeeding rather than worrying about failure, not succeeding, and what ifs.
 
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